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Who Should Consider IVF

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Azoospermia / Oligo astheno spermia

Azoospermia
Azoospermia

Azoospermia is the medical condition of a man not having any measurable level of sperm in his semen. It is associated with very low levels of fertility or even sterility, but many forms are amenable to medical treatment. In humans, azoospermia affects about 1% of the male population and may be seen in up to 20% of male infertility situations

Azoospermia is usually detected in the course of an infertility investigation. It is established on the basis of two semen analysis evaluations done at separate occasions (when the seminal specimen after centrifugation shows no sperm under the microscope) and requires a further work-up.

Tubal Block

Tubal Block
Tubal Block

Blocked fallopian tubes are unable to let the ovum and the sperm converge, thus making fertilization impossible. Fallopian Tubes are also known as oviducts, uterine tubes, and salpinges (singular salpinx).

Most commonly a tube may be obstructed due to infection such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The rate of tubal infertility has been reported to be 12% after one, 23% after two, and 53% after three episodes of PID The Fallopian tubes may also be occluded or disabled by endometritis, infections after childbirth and intraabdominal infections includingappendicitis and peritonitis. The formation of adhesions may not necessarily block a fallopian tube, but render it dysfunctional by distorting or separating it from the ovary.

Severe Endometriosis

Severe Endometriosis
Severe Endometriosis

Severe Endometriosis is a disease in which tissue that normally grows inside theuterus grows outside the uterus. Its main symptoms are pelvic pain and infertility. Nearly half have chronic pelvic pain, while in 70% pain occurs during menstruation. Infertility occurs in up to half of people. Less common symptoms include urinary or bowel symptoms. About 25% of women have no symptoms. Endometriosis can have both social and psychological effects.

Poly Cystic Ovarian disease

Poly Cystic Ovarian disease

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), also called hyperandrogenic anovulation (HA) or Stein–Leventhal syndrome, is a set of symptoms due to a hormone imbalance in women. Symptoms include: irregular or nomenstrual periods, heavy periods, excess body and facial hair, acne, pelvic pain, trouble getting pregnant, and patches of thick, darker, velvety skin.

PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder among women between the ages of 18 and 44. It affects approximately 5% to 10% of this age group. It is one of the leading causes of poor fertility.

Advanced age where fertility declines

Advanced age where fertility declines

Female fertility is affected by age. After puberty, female fertility increases and then decreases, with advanced maternal agecausing an increased risk of female infertility. In humans, a woman’s fertility peaks in the early and mid-20s, after which it starts to decline slowly, with a more dramatic drop at around 35. Menopause, or the cessation of menstrual periods, generally occurs in the 40s and 50s and marks the cessation of fertility, although age-related infertility can occur before then. The relationship between age and female fertility is popularly referred to as a woman’s “biological clock”; when a woman reaches an age where fertility is commonly understood to drop, it can be said that her “biological clock is ticking.”

Unexplained infertility

In unexplained infertility abnormalities are likely to be present but not detected by current methods. Possible problems could be that the egg is not released at the optimum time for fertilization, that it may not enter the fallopian tube, sperm may not be able to reach the egg, fertilization may fail to occur, transport of the zygote may be disturbed, or implantation fails. It is increasingly recognized that egg quality is of critical importance and women of advanced maternal age have eggs of reduced capacity for normal and successful fertilization. Also, polymorphisms in folate pathway genes could be one reason for fertility complications in some women with unexplained infertility. Aberrant reproductive immunology such as decreasedmaternal immune tolerance towards the embryo may also be a possible explanation.

Failed IUI treatment

Failed IUI treatment

Failed IUI treatment: Usually we do IUI for 3 cycle at an interval of one month . If this mode of treatment does not result in a pregnancy next option is IVF.

Premature Ovarian Failure

Premature ovarian failure (POF) is when a woman’s ovaries stop working before she is 40. POF is different from premature menopause. With premature menopause, your periods stop before age 40. You can no longer get pregnant. The cause can be natural or it can be a disease, surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation.

Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to look inside your uterus in order to diagnose and treat causes of abnormal bleeding. Hysteroscopy is done using a hysteroscope, a thin, lighted tube that is inserted into the vagina to examine the cervix and inside of the uterus. Hysteroscopy can be either diagnostic or operative.

Endometrial receptivity assay (ERA)

Many women trying to conceive through IVF fail the egg implantation process even when embryos appear healthy and the uterine cavity looks normal. Chances are they are having an underlying problem related to the endometrium (the inner lining of the uterus).

One of the causes of infertility is the inability of the uterus to hold on to a healthy embryo. Experts until recently believed that the viability of an embryo is the sole determinant of a successful IVF cycle. But recent studies have discovered that while the quality of embryos is an important factor, the receptivity of the uterus also plays a significant role in deciding the fate of the IVF cycle.

Medical science has now made it possible to determine how receptive a woman’s uterus is in relation to the embryo. The test called Endometrial Receptivity Array (ERA) not only measures the receptivity of the uterus, but also helps determine the exact time for embryo transfer which offers the best chances of success.

Platelet rich plasma (PRP)

PRP stands for platelet rich plasma. Blood, in addition to red and white blood cells, contains platelets which are rich in growth factors. Growth factors promote normal healing by restoring the normal architecture and strength of the damaged tissue. In a platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection, the patient’s own blood is processed at high speeds, resulting in higher concentrations of the patient’s own growth and healing factors, which are then injected into the injured area promoting a more potent healing response.